Category Archives: Association for Clinical Pastoral Education

Chaplain Harold’s June Newsletter is Ready to Read and Download!

Click the link below to read/download the June Newsletter (June 2018 Newsletter Vol 1 No. 2 ).

Click here to read/download the May Newsletter.

 

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Why the Chaplain Should Write the Obituary

Over the years I have paid rigorous attention to developments in the lifecare and deathcare professions both locally and on the regional, national and international scenes. I take the time and make the effort to do this because I truly believe that lifecare and deathcare are, like life and death, intimately connected transitions that require not only compassion and sensitivity in the acute phases of bereavement but also awareness of what remains traditional and important and what changes are affecting the funeral homes and families I serve.

One of my roles as a psychospiritual care provider and as an interfaith bereavement chaplain is to stay abreast of these trends and to share and teach colleagues and clients about them and their influence on how we serve in our respective vocations. We are after all not only service providers but educators and teachers, ministers to the suffering.

Flexibility and responsiveness are key to the psychospiritual care and chaplaincy vocation just as much as they are to the deathcare services professions. We are, after all, in the ranks of the healthcare professions just as any physician, nurse, psychologist, or administrator is; the difference is that in contrast with the physician, nurse, psychologist or administrator, the chaplain and the funeral director are called to care for both the living and the dead. That’s an important distinction and has important implications for how we do what we do and the quality of what we do.

We each have our specific professional training and we must not overstep our competencies.

As I have written elsewhere, we each have our roles and we have to recognize boundaries, fixed and flexible ones. I frequently use the example that I don’t do embalming and I don’t expect the funeral director to do the spiritual funeral rites. While our roles and engagement with the bereaved do sometimes overlap such as in providing grief support, we each have our specific professional training and we must not overstep our competencies.

That having been said, there are some things that have been conventionally — I say “conventionally” and not “traditionally” because they are done by tacit acquiescence between and among the parties involved in the funeralization processes —, one of which is the creation of the obituary for the deceased.

Conventionally the creation of the obituary has been left to the newspaper obit editor or to the funeral director or one of the funeral home staff. The result is that the obituary, unless it is the obituary of a prominent or eminent personality, has been little more than an enhanced death notice, and there are significant differences between the purposes and composition of a death notice compared to an obituary.

In brief, an obituary is an announcement of a person’s death along with a biography of the person. The obituary generally includes information about the about the deceased, birth and death dates and places, information about the deceased’s life, survivors and predeceased close relatives, the deceased’s life accomplishments, funeral or memorial arrangements, floral tributes and donations, and a frequently a picture of the deceased. The information provided in the obituary should provide the reader with a credible impression of who the deceased was as a person. A death notice is a brief  announcement of a person’s death and the funeral or memorial services. A death notice may or may not include a picture. It is not uncommon for the death notice to be the only print notice of a death; the actual obituary may appear only on the funeral home website or an online obituary site. Content is not the only way the two differ; they not only differ in length and content but also in cost, but that’s a topic for another article.

Regrettably, because of (1) the urgency of the situation: the death notice or obituary or both must be created and published within a narrow window of time to provide the public with details relating to the death and to the funeral arrangements. The personal interactions and relationships: The bereaved are in the acute phase of grief with all of the associated emotions, the funeral staff are under pressure to manage not only the legal and official obligations connected with a death and disposition of a dead human being but also with the business aspects of providing funeral services to the family as well as providing short-term grief support. So it’s not uncommon for the obituary to become just another laundry list item that the funeral director must do before getting to bed.

The current options are not all that rosy: either the funeral director makes an honorable but exhausted effort at composing an obituary from the few facts and bits of information he has been able to garner in his contacts with the family OR the task is left to the professional obit writer with the local newspaper who faces the same problems as the funeral director. The solutions are just as grim: Cookie-cutter obituaries. Either the FD or the obit editor/writer uses a form or template or information is plugged into a computer program and then tweaked. Worse still, a family member is stuck with writing something about which they have no clue much less any writing skills.

The current “conventional” practice is not only inefficient it’s downright unfair.

So what’s the alternative? Well, I’ve given the matter some thought and have come to the obvious conclusion that there’s a lot of duplication or triplication of effort involved and that the current “conventional” practice is not only inefficient it’s downright unfair not only to the deathcare professionals involved but also to the bereaved, and not insignificantly to the deceased him or herself. who deserve a much better treatment at least in their obit.

So, while I was going through notes on past services, articles published in the scientific, scholarly, and professional journals, my own writings, and after having reviewed a considerable number of published obits, it dawned on me that none of these obit writers had access to the quality, amount, and type of information that I have as the chaplain to the family. While it’s true the FD or the obit editor/writer ask certain standard questions, the result is a standard dry obit. The intimate sharing that goes on during the Chaplain-Family Conference results in an enormous richness of information about the deceased, his or her life and activities, accomplishments, anecdotes, legacy, meaning to those close to him or her and to the community. In fact, a whole living narrative is collected in the course of that sharing experience.

While some of the information shared by the family must be held respectfully confidential and never published, my motto being “Tell me your secrets and I’ll forget them.” Other information shared by the family and close friends become part of the memorialization process, part of the coping process, form the basis of the necessary continuing bond with the deceased. As a skilled writer, speaker, presenter, ritual leader, I use much of that information as part of the psychospiritual care I provide both before and during the funeralization rites and rituals I create. One of those rituals is most conspicuously the homily or the so-called Words of Comfort or my trademark Litany of Thanksgiving and Remembrance. So what happens with all of that incredibly healing information after the homily is delivered and the Litany is read? Not much.

So, my question was: “Why aren’t I called upon to create the obituary?” After all, I actually have more information than anyone involved, even more than some family members, which is obvious during the Chaplain-Family Conference when one family member describes an event and another looks surprised and says, “I didn’t know that? S/he never mentioned that.” What a beautiful moment of epiphany for some.

But if the chapel service and the homily and the Litany of Thanksgiving and Remembrance are not recorded, much of this evaporates into the abyss of forgotten memories. That really should not happen and it doesn’t have to happen.

In my view, the obituary is more, much more than a simple death notice. It should be a cheat sheet for remembering who and what the dead loved one was and their meaning and legacy. It should be something that is preserved and enshrined as a source of information about a forebear that can be shared with future generations. It should be cherished as a lasting and enduring portrait of the dead loved one that can serve as a support in establishing the important continuing bond with the dead loved one. To achieve this holy purpose, it must be written with intimacy, sensitivity, reverence, and skill; care must be taken to select and to include the most salient and essential elements that are most important to the family and closest friends. Only then will it be worth the effort.

In order to achieve this noble purpose, I have conceived of several types of obituary: (i) the conventional, which incorporates essential bits and pieces into a coherent whole, and  (ii) several custom obits, each focusing on a specific aspect of the deceased’s life:

  1. Biohistorical – Describes the deceased’s life in an historical, biographical style.
  2. Social – Describes the deceased’s life emphasizing social aspects such as community, organizational, political, sports, etc. activities and involvement.
  3. Legacy – Emphasizes the deceased’s accomplishments that will be remembered by those close to him/her and by the community at large.
  4. Lifestyle – Focuses on what the deceased liked to do in terms of hobbies, travel, leisure, community, etc. Lifestyle differs from Social themes in that Lifestyle focuses more on the individual than on his contributions to the community.
  5. Custom – By arrangement with the family. This “obit” may take the form of a personal narrative, a story, in other words. Or it might take the form of a lesson. By drawing on the concepts and material of the conventional and the custom obits (1-4, above) a novel and unique narrative of the live of the deceased can be created.

So why not take advantage of the skills of the bereavement chaplain and turn over the obit writing to him? Sound like a plan?

Whether the obituary is to be published in the print media, in an online public obituary space, on the funeral home tributes page, on Facebook, on an online obit platform like Legacy.com, or in any combination of these, I as the chaplain serving the funeral home and the family am in the best position to provide a quality product. The obit should be between 250 and 500 words in length, depending on the available information and what the family want to emphasize. The question of whether a photo should be included always comes up. I answer with an affirmative “Why not?” but I do qualify that by saying that the photo should be compatible with the content of the obit. For example, if the family is emphasizing the early years, the photo should not be of the deceased late life. If the obit emphasizes the deceased’s community activities, it would be effective if a photo of the deceased in his or her Lions Club or other social or community regalia were shown.

It should be kept in mind that the chaplain is writing the obit, not publishing it. The chaplain can provide some ballpark figures on what, say, print publication of the final obit as approved by the family might cost but the final approved obit should be submitted to the newspaper obit editor for a final pricing quote. Some papers will publish a death notice for free, others will charge a classified ad rate. Obituaries are longer and might include a picture, all of which affect the price, usually calculated on the basis of the column inch (one column inch of newsprint is approximately 35 words).

The funeral home can usually offer space on their Tributes pages which generally includes an Obituary section. The funeral home should provide this opportunity at no charge.

There are many online options and opportunities for publishing an obituary. Some of these online options include social media such as Facebook, Instagram, and similar platforms.  There are also the established online obituary sites. I have researched some of the sites and have compiled a list of ten top sites (Click here to view Top 10 Sites.)

So the decision is really a no-brainer. If you’re a funeral director, save yourself the time and stress of writing an obituary. If you are a consumer, hand the job over to the professional who can do the best for you and your loved one, the skilled professional chaplain.

 

A New Blog: Funeralization and Chaplain Services


Funeralization & Chaplain Services


You are invited to visit, follow and participate in this new specialist blog dedicated to funeral and memorial services, the important but frequently overlooked role of the interfaith bereavement chaplain,  and many other funeralization and deathcare topics.


This new blog will share with its readers a plethora of information on the funeral services niche, what to ask for, what to avoid, who to avoid, and what services you should ask for, if you are a consumer, or offer, if you are a funeral director, both during pre-arrangement meetings and when making immediate need arrangements.

Visit Funeralization & Chaplain Services blog here.
Join the Interfaith Chaplain group on Facebook here.
Learn about Chaplain Services available to you here.

We feel it is extremely important that consumers be offered the opportunity to consult and to talk to a professional interfaith bereavement chaplain, and that consumers should request such a conference; on the other hand, funeral homes should provide such an opportunity to all persons making funeral or memorial arrangements.

We are staunch supporters of the traditional funeral for all of its important psychological, spiritual, and cultural benefits. We are also strongly in support of locally owned and operated funeral homes as opposed to the corporate funeral groups and the factory-funeral service providers. Having said that, we do not believe that the traditional funeral should be outrageously extravagant or expensive but that it should be simple and dignified, personalized to reflect the family culture and the life of the deceased.

Welcome to this blog. Contribute to this blog. Make this blog a place of sharing.

Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Chaplain Harold at funeralization@gmail.com or, if you are in immediate need of chaplain services or bereavement support, please call Chaplain Harold at (518) 810-2700.

Visit us also on Facebook and become a friend!

Check the “Experts” — Giving Incorrect Advice

Summary: The deluge of information that floods us today from myriad “providers” on the Internet is the source of enormous confusion and misinformation. This misinformation affects not only the lay person but the professional as well. The most nefarious of these sources of confusion and misinformation affect those suffering at life’s transitions, points of existential crisis, health, life and death. Some of these websites and blogs claim to be written by persons with extensive knowledge to share; others, regrettably, are written by self – appointed pundits whose ignorance is conspicuous only to the trained professional. This means that much that the narcissistic charlatans publish makes it under the radar and is accepted by many unwary information consumers as being good, reliable information when, in fact, it’s not worth the bandwidth its transmitting on. This article reviews one such site, funeralOne, that alleges to support the funeral services industry. Sites such as funeralOne must be vetted by responsible professionals.

sheeple-eating-up-liesThe glut of information both reliable and questionable, and the possibility of instant answers, and hence instant gratification, have contributed to the general population’s low standards for quality in much of what it consumes, including the information and education they receive. This comment applies not only to the millenials whose extreme lows apply to just about everything in their generation from  the quality of their education, morals, self-esteem, tolerance of failure, etc., etc., etc. but also to many professions, including the pastoral care professions and other helping professions, most notably the funeral service profession. The problem is that ignorant Gen Ys and Gen Zs, millenials and centennials, are dominating the media and the less tech – savvy boomers and Xers are subject to the millennial penchant for laziness and ignorance, and instantaneous gratification even at the expense of accuracy and substance.

I subscribe to a number of professional information providers both in print and online, and in the process I have learned to become very critical, if not cynical, of what I receive in my mailbox or inbox. While, at least in some disciplines, the publishing industry continues to have some scruples about what gets ink — or bandwidth nowadays — and what does not, and many respectable journals continue to subject submissions to peer review, the online publishing is an abyss of garbage and misinformation.

This article is focusing on one such publishing activity that directs its attention to the funeral service industry and is a fine example of the kind of narcissism we are combating on almost a moment-by-moment basis. I’m talking about the online blog funeralOne, which provides the following self-description:

funeralOne is a personalization, technology, and consulting company for the funeral care profession. funeralOne’s core services include strategic funeral home web site design, personal funeral service consulting, and funeral tribute video software. Committed to delivering innovation, funeralOne collaborates with its clients to help them reach their full market potential. With deep industry expertise, broad resources and a proven track record, funeralOne can mobilize the right people, skills, and technologies to help clients reach their customers in new ways. (funeralOne, last accessed on November 26, 2016. Emphasis added)

Seems like they want to take over the roles of mortuary science education, board examination and licensing, and the function of the funeral service residency requirement because you can get all that at funeralOne. There’s only one problem with this utopia of [mis]information and consulting services for the “funeral care profession”, whatever that is, and that problem is that much of the information published by funeralOne is poorly edited, full of mistakes, loaded with factoids, and generally unreliable.

funeralOne's Chastain

funeralOne’s Chastain

I’m a firm believer that one swallow doesn’t make a summer, and so I look beyond one example to form an opinion. I’ve done this on the funeralOne site and found that there is a pattern. One example of the overall pattern presented by funeralOne is by one of its most prolific misinformation and disinformation specialists, one Rilee Chastain (Hi! I’m Rilee Chastain), who allegedly graduated “cum laude” from Columbia College (Chicago) with a degree in Guess what? journalism – doesn’t say a hell of a lot for Columbia’s journalism program, does it? We’ll use just one of her many poorly written articles providing the “funeral care industry” with unreliable “industry expertise”. The article is entitled “3 Things You Need to Know About Hispanic Funerals.” (last accessed on November 26, 2016).

When differentiating the use of Hispanic, Latino, Latin, Louis E. V. Nevaer of Hispanic Economics writes:

This all said, Hispanics, Latinos, and Latins are distinct individuals, who, at times, loathe one another, and, on occasion, seethe when grouped together. Say “Latino” to the wrong person, and an unintended insult results. Say “Hispanic” to the wrong person, and you will be dismissed as being “prejudiced.” It is important to remember that “Hispanic” and “Latino” can each be considered a pejorative, depending on the listener’s sensibilities. What can be said with certainty is that, intellectually, “Latino,” used when speaking in English, is the name given to the children of the Hispanic diaspora in the United States. (“Hispanic” versus “Latino” versus “Latin” (last accessed on November 27, 2016).

So, even giving Ms Chastain the benefit of doubt, she is writing about the Spanish-speaking ethnic community in the United States that embraces the vast culturally diverse geographical groups that include the Caribbeans, the Central Americans, South Americans, Mexicans, as well as the Spanish-speaking populations in the United States.  Chastain lumps them all together and yet insists that her readers be “culturally sensistive.” But since the 1990’s Latino has been used to describe those Hispanics born in the United States. (Meanwhile, Chicano and Mexican American have fallen out of popular usage.)

So it’s rather unclear which group is Ms Chastain’s subject, and it doesn’t become any clearer as we read her sometimes offensive article, which becomes the poster-article for all such wannabe pundits for the mortuary service professional

ConnectingDirectors' Thogmartin

ConnectingDirectors’ Thogmartin

I’d also include here the online publication Connecting Directors by Disrupt Media and its founder Ryan Thogmartin, which at least publishes excerpts and borrowings from more authoritative sources, sparing one the ordeal of being exposed only to Disrupt’s and Mr Thogmartin’s marketing videos and silly interviews.. ConnectingDirectors also describes itself as:

ConnectingDirectors.com is the premier progressive online publication for funeral professionals. ConnectingDirectors.com is now a thriving global publication with a reader base of over 15,000 of the most elite and forward-thinking professionals in the industry. Founder and CEO Ryan Thogmartin has a vision for where the funeral profession is headed, and has used that vision to successfully position the site as the leading online resource for funeral professionals.

Every narcissist can find a home on the Internet as Thogmartin’s self-description proves:

Ryan Thogmartin is a death care entrepreneur and the CEO of DISRUPT Media and creator of ConnectingDirectors.com. | Follower of Christ | Husband | Father | Entrepreneur | Host of #DISRUPTu! and #FUNERALnationtv | Lover of Skittles

ConnectingDirectors also has the dubious distinction of republishing many of funeralOne’s substandard information posts.

dia-de-los-muertosBack to funeralOne. We must note that Ms Chastain does select a traditional Mexican Día de los Muertos image of an ornate skull, which tends to focus one on a more Mexican ethnic version of the “Hispanic” in the title, in which case, Ms Chastain’s article falls even farther from the mark. This is where we get the strong impression that funeralOne and Ms Chastain have no clue about what they’re writing. If this is how funeralOne expects to provide their clients with “deep industry expertise” they should find another job; what’s true, though, is funeralOne’s claim that it is “delivering innovation,” the factoids in Ms Chastain’s article are certainly innovative, even fictional.

In her opening paragraph Ms Chastain affirms, even if only in the broadest general strokes, that her intended audience is “in the business of giving people meaningful funeral and memorial services…no matter what their background may be.” I don’t think the funeral homes, with whom I have the privilege of working, are in the business of “giving” anyone anything, their goal is to provide a service within a price range affordable by the customer; if that service happens to be meaningful or memorable certainly depends on the customer’s preferences and how the service is orchestrated. Many funeral service providers offer direct cremation and burial services because that’s what the customer wants; I fail to see how direct services are meaningful. But detail doesn’t seem to be Chastain’s forté.

Moving on. Ms Chastain writes the truism that “every culture has their own unique traditions” and includes in that statement that this includes “even the length of the celebration process” I’ve been providing interfaith officiation services for some years now and I’ve not come across the phrase “celebration process” in practice nor in the literature. Wonder where that neologism came from and what it actually means? (Editor’s Note: “Celebration process” is a neologism that belongs in the same class as the funeral innovator’s creations like “experience economy,” “competitive reality,” and other inventions that serve only to make a provider’s intentions more cryptic.)

Ms Chastain first becomes mildly offensive when she arrogantly announces that she knows the right way we should be doing things and she’s going to tell us all about it: “So it’s important that you know the right way to do that for families of different backgrounds and traditions.” Gee, Mr Funeral Director of 10, 20, 30, 40 years! Why didn’t you ever think of that? And you directors of mortuary science programs, Why didn’t you ever think of that? And seminaries and CPE programs, where’d you drop the ball? Aren’t we lucky to have the Rilee Chastains and funeralOnes of the world there to get us on track with new concepts, new ethnicities, new vocabulary, and new ways of doing things?

And so, again, Ms Chastain writes that the “Hispanic community” and “Hispanic Americans” (Wotz that?) are a “massive part of the United States’ population…1 of 6 residents [sic] nationwide”; by our math that’s about 16.6%. (For ethic group statistics for Population of the United States by Race and Hispanic/Latino Origin, Census 2000 and 2010,  last accessed on November 27, 2016). According to Ms Chastain, the “Hispanic” population will be “one third of citizens” in the US in the US. Are we comparing apple with oranges, “residents” with “citizens”? According to Ms Chastain it appears that Hispanics are Latinos and “residents” are “citizens”. But then, we have to remember, funeralOne through Ms Chastain, is “providing deep industry expertise” and “delivering innovation.” (See “What’s the difference between Hispanic and Latino?“) Our guess is that Ms Chastain graduated from a non-English journalism program.

so-called journalismMs Chastain writes that a “large percentage of Hispanic families are Catholic”, that this fact influences many aspects of Hispanic culture””–Hold on! Isn’t religion an element of culture? OK. We’re splitting hairs, you say. But Ms Chastain confuses just about everything making religion equivalent to spirituality, “prayer and worship” into “rituals surrounding death” and making the casket “a sacred shrine of sorts”– and here’s where Ms Chastain’s real ignorance is glaringly conspicuous — including images or statues of religious idols. Yes, dear reader, Chastain writes that these religious images and statues are “religious idols”!!! Does any Catholic or Christian have anything to say about Ms Chastain’s religious, cultural, “deep industry” expertise, or the quality of her facts?

Chastain mentions the Virgin Mary several times in the article, once as “a popular representative of the religion in Hispanic funerals”, and again as being “strongly represented in these family-oriented traditions”, again mentioning that the mourners “often gather to adorn the casket with statues or prayer cards and rosaries of the blessed mother.” What’s particularly ignorant in this statement is the “rosaries of the blessed mother”: I’m not sure what a “rosary of the blessed mother” and the fact that “blessed mother” is in lower case and not capitalized makes it unclear what Chastain means.

Another neologism is “overnight wakes”. My initial guess would be that Chastain means overnight or all-night vigils as are practiced in a number of denominations. Chastain obviously does not have an education in the field to know the correct terminology but then she and funeralOne are only “delivering deep industry expertise.” But we’re not convinced it’s deep funeral industry expertise. Maybe it’s deep fertilizer industry expertise. Who knows?

The third thing we professionals need to know about, according to Ms Chastain and funeralOne, is that “Hispanic funerals are a traditionally social event” a “Celebration of Life. Chastain goes on to say that food and drinks are often served at wakes. Somehow Ms Chastain hasn’t heard about some states’ health laws that prohibit food and beverages in funeral homes. All of the “Hispanic” funerals at which I have officiated were pretty somber, serious affairs. All were in funeral homes. An food and beverages were never served during the wake or vigil. Certainly no jokes or games were evident, and maybe I am going to the wrong parties or at least not the kind of parties funeralOne or Ms Chastain throw, because none of the “Hispanic” funerals I have done were like any party I’ve been to. I could go on about funeralOne and this article by Chastain but I think I’ve made my point. Truth be told, the article continues in this same fashion and only continues to illustrate my points already made. Any real death-care professional should be incensed by these phonies and imposters offering their ignorance and stupidity as “deep industry expertise.” Any journalist worthy of her keyboard should be expected to be thorough, factual, and accurate, and to have done her homework.

Got 'shrooms?

Got ‘shrooms?

The funeralOne blog, its posts, and its contributors should serve as a warning and as an example of the ignorance and half-baked misinformation and narcissists offering their ignorance as expertise. The problem is endemic and is only getting worse. As a thanatologist and professional, I urge all of my readers to get their information from authoritative, documented, reliable sources and to forget about these toadstools that pop up when it gets dark and, which when consumed, are hallucinogenic at best, and intellectually and economically in their general effects.

What is particularly unsettling is the fact that this article, to my knowledge, is the first to call these charlatans and those of their ilk out and to make them accountable for their propagation of ignorance. Why is that? Do the rest of the profession read this stuff and just let it pass through their rectums unnoticed? We are all accountable, and it’s high time we realized that.

As professionals, we have a responsibility to ourselves to ensure that we are aware of what’s out there; a responsibility to each other to ensure that we police the information that’s out there and ensure that only quality information is available; a responsibility to those who seek our care and to ensure that they are treated fairly and with compassion. This includes ensuring that the self – proclaimed experts providing substandard information anywhere, are put on notice and purged from the public view. Short of government censorship, we have to assume the responsibility for the health of our profession and this starts with good information and effective education of ourselves, our colleagues, and the people we serve.

Don't be their puppets! Cut the strings of disinformation!

Don’t be their puppets! Cut the strings of disinformation!

Missing the Mark: Are the suffering ones really being served?


Are we hearing the cries for help? Are we really relieving the suffering caused by our “care”? This is a question I have been asking myself for several years now, after having done an elective 400 hour intensive clinical pastoral education unit at Albany Medical Center (AMC), a 600+ bed regional acute, primary, secondary, tertiary care teaching hospital in Albany, New York. For about four years now I have been tracking the Pastoral Care department there and,  over that period, have been able to make some on-site, personal observations of the “pastoral care” being provided at AMC, and must report that, at best, the overall care was very disappointing.


Are we hearing the cry for help?

Are we hearing the cry for help?

If AMC is representative of the state of “pastoral care” in the Northeast or in the United States as a whole, what does that say about all those words and ink spilled in the scientific, clinical, and professional journals about “relief of suffering?” Is it all pablum-puking palaver from the top of the ivory towers? Wishful thinking? Are the chaplaincy organizations and “certifying bodies” simply self-serving special interest (their own) groups providing certificates for cash, and satisfying the paper-mill appetites of both consumers and human resources dullards? We want certificates not skills or competence? It would seem so from our observation point.

As an informal survey, we looked at the AMC pastoral care staff page on the AMC web site and reviewed the credentials of the people working in pastoral care at that hospital. Here’s what we found:

The travesty and biggest joke that healthcare facilities — I mean hospitals offering primary, secondary, tertiary, and the rarer quaternary care — and skilled nursing facilities, including those offering rehabilitation,  are foisting on the paying pubic is that they offer what is commonly called “pastoral care,” a term eschewed by those of us who are really professional chaplains because “pastoral” is a hugely Christian term and serves to alienate non-Christian traditions. Fancy that! Far from appreciating what a real chaplain is, most of our healthcare organizations use a discriminatory term to describe the paltry spiritual support they think they provide, but in fact are not providing.

Most facilities rely on volunteer pastoral care, that is, local “visiting clergy” who drop in and wander around cold-calling (dropping in on patients or residents) or visiting their own church members. As for those that actually have a paid— and reimbursed chaplaincy program — the composition of that staff raises concerns about competency and bias. Seriously.

Really? We don't think so!

Really? We don’t think so!

One regional medical center in Albany, New York, Albany Medical Center — the institution does a great deal of public relations and advertising and is more in the real estate business than healthcare — shows a staff of 14, including chaplain interns, chaplain residents, full- and part-time/on-call “chaplains”: Pastoral Care Manager Jake Marvel (personal acquaintance), is a Reformed Church of America (RCA) clergyperson. The RCA is a minor denomination, an offshoot of the Dutch Reformed Church, and Calvinist in its doctrines, rightist liberal Christianity in its leanings; Harlan Ratmeyer (persoanl acquaintance), is director of a chaplain training program, a RCA minister, in his late 70’s and beyond retirement; biased and distracted. Staff Chaplain Yervant Kutchukian, is an Armenian Orthodox, with apparently various contemplative interests. Pastoral Care department secretary, Elizabeth Hall, is Roman Catholic, but doesn’t work as a pastoral care provider despite having several units of chaplain training — most of which was apparently acquired by sitting behind her desk. Aloysius Kabunga is a native of Uganda, Black African, with some seminary training and an eclectic educational background but no stated faith tradition (do we assume he’s some sort of Christian adherent?). Valerie Cox, female, another African American on staff, is an “ordained” Baptist minister with a degree from a “bible institute,” whatever that means. Kabanga BoswamiNO! I didn’t make that up — is yet another Black African on staff, from the Democratic Republic of Congo, has degrees in business admin, computer science and divinity. Marjorie S McCoy, female, Buddhist adherent to an American Buddhist tradition, has a B.A. in comparative religions, worked as attorney for 23 years, was a hospice volunteer for six years, and is now an intern in chaplaincy — this means she’s out there on the floors at AMC with little or no training. YA is a staff chaplain but I can’t make out his actual credentials from his blurb. Mary C. Craven, white female, has some credentials and 9 units of clinical pastoral education at AMC (she’s Roman Catholic by tradition). Two Roman Catholic priests serve as chaplains at AMC Kenneth Gregory and Robert DeLeon, enough said. A rabbi and an imam serve the Jewish and Muslim traditions at AMC but are not “staff” in that they are on-call, for their own people. At AMC, the Roman Catholic chaplains serve on an alternating day schedule; I have experienced situations at AMC when neither RC chaplain was available. Naturally, the on-call rabbi and imam restrict their care to their faith tradition. So that’s 4 chaplains out of the total of 14 that serve their specific faith groups: Roman Catholicism, Judaism, Islam. Two part-time chaplains, one cultural Pakistani male, Younas Azad (personal knowledge) and one elderly white female, M. Craven (personal knowledge). That leaves 4 “chaplain residents” who are still in training, under the supervision of HR, and four “full-time” staff. Of the four “chaplain residents” 2 are black African males, unknown traditions, and one is an African American female, Baptist tradition. The remaining chaplain-in-training is a white female, Buddhist, with a law background who served as a hospice volunteer. The remainder of the AMC pastoral care “full-time” staff includes two RCA ministers who are PC manager and director, and a secretary.

It needs to be said that the information provided above is publicly available at Meet the Staff and is not provided as a statement of competence or as an assessment of effectiveness of the individuals or of the department as a whole. I’m presenting it as an example of what a 600-bed regional acute, primary, secondary and tertiary care, trauma center, teaching hospital provides by way of spriritual care. Now, I have to ask my readers, given the composition of the PC staff — excluding the secretary, the part-timers, and the rabbi, imam and Catholic priests, who obviously see their own people, What do you think of the composition of the Albany Medical Center “pastoral care” staff? Presuming Albany Medical Center is a fair representation of the state of pastoral care in most similar institutions, What do you think of the likely cultural competency of the staff? Think of it this way, if you were an 84-year old white female, How open or vulnerable would you feel if one of the resident chaplains paid you a visit? How well served do you think the mainline traditions are served by the composition of the AMC pastoral care staff? Finally, do what I did and visit the site and ask yourself the question, “How well served are the some 600+ patients of AMC by this handful of questionably trained pastoral care providers?”

Treating the Parts while Indifferent to the Whole

Treating the Parts while Indifferent to the Whole

We chose Albany Medical Center because of its size, the extent of its services, its PR/advertising claims, and because we have personal knowledge about and experience with that institution. A simple online investigation of most of the other major hospitals in the Albany,  New York, area, including Schenectady and Rensselaer counties, doesn’t provide much satisfaction. Most simply describe a vague “spiritual care” or “pastoral care” entity but not much more. None provide a staff page, which indicates quite clearly to us that they have none and that all of their pastoral care activity is provided by volunteer (= untrained, non-professionals), ancient RC nuns (that’s all that’s left), or “visiting clergy.” Point made. How is it that these so-called healthcare providers get away with not providing total healthcare?

Our conclusion is obvious: Our healthcare institutions — and we include here most hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation facilities, etc. — do not provide competent spiritual care for patients, residents and clients. These institutions donot provide “care” but provide only “procedures.” They operate almost exclusively on the biomedical model which has been around for more than 100 years unchanged, and is based on the body-mind duality espoused by Descartes, the so-called Cartesian duality, in which healthcare treats physical complaints, everything else is in the “spiritual” realm.  In other words, our healthcare institutions treat the disease (the physical manifestations) not the illness, not the person. The treatment received in our healthcare institutions is procedural in nature and the very procedures done as treatment are the source of significant suffering, to which our “care” providers are either indifferent or of which they are ignorant.

Considering that the region we are considering, the Capital District in New York State, a region comprising the counties of Albany, Rensselaer, Schenectady, parts of Greene County, and other areas, we are talking about at least 28 hospitals and 56 nursing homes/rehabilitation facilities. The question we should be asking ourselves is not what kind of care is, rather what procedures are done, but how much suffering those environments and  procedures are causing, and what is being done to relive the total suffering of the patients, residents, and clients?

Please leave us a comment but please be specific and focus on the questions we’ve posed above. We’ve tried to be non-judgmental in presenting the facts; all we ask is for your honest opinion about the pastoral care situation at this regional 600+ bed teaching hospital.

The True Story of Our Healthcare System

The True Story of Our Healthcare System and
Relief of Suffering

New Blog Feature: Articles and Essays

Death Awareness & Education

Death Awareness & Education

Check out the new feature called Articles & Essays. I’m posting my articles and essays for readers who want to read them online or download them.

Try it out and let me know what you think!

Peace and blessings!
Rev. Ch. Harold

Register Now for the Thanatology Café at the RCS Community Library

Please Note: We have just been informed by the RCS Community library that the Thanatology Café sign-up sheets at the RCS Community Library are kept in a binder behind the check-out desk. You must ask a staff member for the book to sign up. 

register-nowWe recently announced an exciting new program coming to the RCS Community Library. The program, which plans to meet regularly monthly and will be supplemented by extraordinary meetings for smaller groups to discuss special topics focusing on death, dying, coping, grief, and death-related topics, has published its Initial Registration Form that can be completed before the Saturday, April 9, 2016, session at the RCS Community Library, from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

The organizers encourage interested participants to download and printout the form and to bring it the the April 9 session; that will save time and will leave more time for the conversations.

Sign-up sheets are also available at the RCS Community library, but interested persons can also R.S.V.P. their intention to attend by sending an e-mail to thanatology.cafe@gmail.com.

We are informed that local churches, fire and rescue departments, police departments, EMS, schools and local funeral directors have been contacted and urged to send representatives.

It’s an important program and will deal with a subject that really needs to be talked about more. It promises to be an outstanding opportunity for sharing, learning and information. Don’t miss it.

register now_red

Initial Registration Form

Of course, if you have any questions, please e-mail the organizers at thanatology.cafe@gmail.com. They will get right back to you with an answer.

Please click the Register Now image to display and download or print out the Initial Registration from, fill it out as completely as possible, and bring it with you to the Thanatology Cafe session on April 9, 2016, at the RCS Community Library, 95 Main Street, Ravena, New York. The session starts promptly at 2 p.m. so please be on time.

And in the meantime, visit the Thanatolgy Café blog.

Well be there and we hope you will be too; we are looking forward to meeting and chatting with you on April 9th!

The Editor

The Editor